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Grupo BM Mentors

Público·47 miembros
Julian Nguyen
Julian Nguyen

Cm2 Tool Spd ^NEW^ Crack


The crack velocity in soda-lime silicate glass was determined at room temperature at water-vapor pressures of 10 to 0.04 torr using the double torsion technique. A precracked glass specimen (70 x 16 x 1.6 mm) was placed in a vacuum chamber containing a four-point bending test apparatus. The plotted experimental results show that the crack propagation curve in water agrees fairly well with that of Wiederhorn (1967). Attention is given to the effect of water vapor pressure on crack velocity at K(I) = 550,000 N/m to the 3/2 power, with (Wiederhorn's data) or without N2 present. The plotted results reveal that the present crack velocity is about two orders of magnitude higher than that of Wiederhorn at high water-vapor conditions, but the difference decreases as the water-vapor concentration diminishes or the crack velocity slows down.




Cm2 Tool Spd Crack


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The goal of this project was to develop visualization tools to study the water vapor dynamics using the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 11 (SAGE 11) water vapor data. During the past years, we completed the development of a visualization tool called EZSAGE, and various Gridded Water Vapor plots, tools deployed on the web to provide users with new insight into the water vapor dynamics. Results and experiences from this project, including papers, tutorials and reviews were published on the main Web page. Additional publishing effort has been initiated to package EZSAGE software for CD production and distribution. There have been some major personnel changes since Fall, 1998. Dr. Mou-Liang Kung, a Professor of Computer Science assumed the PI position vacated by Dr. Waldo Rodriguez who was on leave. However, former PI, Dr. Rodriguez continued to serve as a research adviser to this project to assure smooth transition and project completion. Typically in each semester, five student research assistants were hired and trained. Weekly group meetings were held to discuss problems, progress, new research direction, and activity planning. Other small group meetings were also held regularly for different objectives of this project. All student research assistants were required to submit reports for conference submission.


Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Here we describe preliminary work on the retrieval of vertical profiles of aerosols and water vapor from the CRISM limb observations. The first full set of CRISM limb observations was taken in July 2009, with subsequent limb observations planned once every two months. Each set of limb observations contains about four dozen scans across the limb giving pole-to-pole coverage for two orbits at roughly 100 and 290 W longitude. Radiative transfer modeling taking account of aerosol scattering in the limb-viewing geometry is used to model the observations. The retrievals show the height to which dust and water vapor extend and the location and height of water ice clouds. Results from the First set of CRISM limb observations (July 2009, Ls=300) show dust aerosol well-mixed to about three scale heights above the surface with thin water ice clouds above the dust near the equator and at mid-northern latitudes. Water vapor is concentrated at high southern latitudes.


Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have recently proved to be one of the crucial tools for determining continuous and precise precipitable water vapor (GNSS-MET networks). GNSS, especially CORS networks such as CORS-TR (the Turkish Network-RTK), provide high temporal and spatial accuracy for the wet tropospheric zenith delays which are then converted to the precipitable water vapor due to the fact that they can operate in all weather conditions continuously and economically. The accuracy of wet tropospheric zenith delay highly depends on the accuracy of precipitable water vapor content in the troposphere. Therefore, the precipitable water vapor is an important element of the tropospheric zenith delay. A number of studies can be found in the literature on the determination of the precipitable water vapor from the tropospheric zenith delay. Studies of Hogg showed that when the precipitable water vapor is known, the tropospheric zenith delay can be computed. Askne and Nodius have developed fundamental equations between the wet tropospheric zenith delay and the precipitable water vapor from the equation of the index of refraction in the troposphere. Furthermore, Bevis have developed a linear regression model to determine the weighted mean temperature (Tm) depending on the surface temperature (Ts) in Askne and Nodius studies. For this reason, nearly 9000 radiosonde profiles in USA were analyzed and the coefficients calculated. Similarly, there are other studies on the calculation of those coefficients for different regions: Solbrig for Germany, Liou for Taiwan, Jihyun for South Korea, Dongseob for North Korea, Suresh Raju for India, Boutiouta and Lahcene for Algeria, Bokoye for Canada, Baltink for Netherlands and Baltic, Bock for Africa. It is stated that the weighted mean temperature can be found with a root mean square error of 2-5 K. In addition, there are studies on the calculation of the coefficients globally. Another model for the determination of


Water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs is a means of condensate disposal, as well as a reservoir management tool for enhancing energy recovery and reservoir life. We review different approaches to modeling the complex fluid and heat flow processes during injection into vapor-dominated systems. Vapor pressure lowering, grid orientation effects, and physical dispersion of injection plumes from reservoir heterogeneity are important considerations for a realistic modeling of injection effects. An example of detailed three-dimensional modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers is given.


Silicon carbide (Sic) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) show potential for application in the hot sections of advanced jet engines. The oxidation behavior of these materials has been studied in great detail. In a pure oxygen environment, a silica (SiO2) layer forms on the surface and provides protection from further oxidation. Initial oxidation is rapid, but slows as silica layer grows; this is known as parabolic oxidation. When exposed to model fuel-lean combustion applications (standard in jet engines), wherein the partial pressure of water vapor is approximately 0.5 atm., these materials exhibit different characteristics. In such an environment, the primary oxidant to form silica is water vapor. At the same time, water vapor reacts with the surface oxide to form gaseous silicon hydroxide (Si(OH)4). The simultaneous formation of both silica and Si(OH)4 -the latter which is lost to the atmosphere- the material continues to recede. Recession rates for uncoated Sic and Si3N4 are unacceptably high, for use in jet engines, - on the order of 1mm/4000h. External coatings have been developed that protect Si-based materials from water vapor attack. One such coating consists of a Ba(0.75)Sr(0.25)Al2Si2O8 (BSAS) topcoat, a mullite/BSAS intermediate layer and a Si bond coat. The key function of the topcoat is to protect the Si-base material from water vapor; therefore it must be fairly stable in water vapor (recession rate of about 1mm/40,000h) and remain crack free. Although BSAS is much more resistant to water vapor attack than pure silica, it exhibits a linear weight loss in 50% H2O - 50% O2 at 1500 C. The objective of my research is to determine the oxidation behavior of a number of alternate hot-pressed monolithic top coat candidates. Potential coatings were exposed at 1500 C to a 50% H2O - 50% O2 gas mixture flowing at 4.4 cm/s . These included rare- earth silicates, barium-strontium aluminosilicates. When weight changes were measured with a continuously recording


Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. We show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration of water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. Our findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry.


Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Some effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. Furthermore, we show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration ofmore water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. These findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry. less


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